Archives for posts with tag: Chinese

Taking a break today from our meatless Mondays for some homemade zong zi (粽子), traditionally eaten during the Dragon Boat Festival (端午節). My MIL made these, and they require a lot of time and work. She doesn’t like store bought ones and only eaten the ones she wrapped. According to my MIL, during her younger days, she used to make a big load and handed them out. Now, she only makes them for herself and her immediate family, which still requires days of preparation. IMG_7600

From the salty egg to the roast pork, from washing the bamboo leaves to boiling (for hours), she hands wrap each and everyone by herself.  Because we get it from her every year, I don’t normally buy them so I don’t know what others taste like. However, I must say, her zong zi is loaded with a decent amount of filling and hence, quite tasty. IMG_7603

A Friday ritual.

A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week.

A simple, special, extraordinary moment.

A moment I want to pause, savor and remember – {this moment}IMG_7162

Love the meatless Monday meal today, especially the lotus roots (a good source of iron and vitamins) stir fry with fungus. IMG_7025

Another quick and easy meal for our busy Wednesday night schedule – one with basketball practice and another violin lesson. FullSizeRender

Bought this very nice piece of pork belly for awhile and couldn’t wait to try out the roast pork recipe I found on Instagram. I was a bit hesitant to make it at first, afraid that I would mess it up (even though the recipe was foolproof). I decided to give it a shot since I would never know if I didn’t try.IMG_6977

The meat came out beautifully, except the skin was not thick enough for the crispiness, plus it was a bit on the salty side. These are the things I need to work on for my next piece of delicacy!IMG_6978Overall, it made it the dinner table tonight.IMG_6982

Meatless Monday, oh, how I missed having the greens.

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Meatless Monday tonight calls for a hearty and flavorful dumpling recipe filled with diced five spice tofu, chives, carrots, black ear fungus and jicama (for the crunch). Pan fried, just couldn’t get any better than this.Untitled

After an exciting game this morning, we detoured to the Locke Historic District near Sacramento before heading home. This is an unincorporated area built by Chinese immigrants during the early 1900’s. We stopped by the visitor center (also known as the boarding house) and found out the town is named Locke, after George Locke, who owned the land. He leased to the Chinese, at a time when Chinese people were not allowed to own land. All the museums are free and let us roam around. The attractions include besides the visitor’s center: a Chinese language school, a museum, a memorial garden, a gambling hall, a theatre, and a meeting place (even had a round of Chinese chess), all within walking distance.  There was a calligraphy lesson in the Chinese school, so we sat down and practiced.

The whole district consisted of 2 main blocks, so it was a nice stroll. Locke is certainly unique with rustic charm and surrounded with “lost in time” feel. Happy we decided the detour for this opportunity to learn about the rich history of Chinese immigrants. It’s definitely worth the visit.

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From the website: Locke is the only remaining authentic Chinese village in the United States of America. Although many cities in America have a Chinatown, Locke is the only separate Chinese community that was built by, and exclusively for, Chinese immigrants. Locke was virtually unknown outside of California until a book entitled “Bitter Melon” by Jeff Gillenkirk with photographs by James Motlow was published.  At one time, 600 residents, all of whom were Chinese, lived in this three square block community. Now the permanent population of the town is less than 100, and less than a dozen of the residents are Chinese. The origin of the Chinese town of Locke dates back to 1915 when a fire in the neighboring town of Walnut Grove destroyed the city’s Chinatown. Locke was established by Lee Bing, on land owned by George Locke in 1915. There were two sections in the Walnut Grove Chinatown, one of which was populated by Chinese immigrants from Chungshan (中山) and the other by immigrants from Sze Yap in China. The Chungshan group decided to rebuild their community a half mile south of Walnut Grove where there were already three buildings in a tiny hamlet called Lockeport.

Our Chinese lessons have cut a couple of days because of the boys activities (basketball practice and fencing). Therefore, I try to squeeze in longer lessons (moans and groans) and even during dinner (for reviews). I’m just glad they still want to continue.

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A Friday ritual.

A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week.

A simple, special, extraordinary moment.

A moment I want to pause, savor and remember – {this moment}

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