Archives for posts with tag: Chinese

Having Cantonese style stir fry sticky rice for dinner tonight. It’s not the healthiest meal, so I don’t make it often, plus it’s takes a lot of patience. However, it is very good, with the Chinese sausage, mushrooms, dried shrimps, scrambled eggs, and some green onions, the boys can easily chow down two big bowls. I normally “raw fry” the rice while adding water until cooked. It requires constant stir frying of the rice which makes the rice chewy. You can cheat and make the rice in rice cooker, but it doesn’t taste the same. Seriously, this is the best way and only way to have stir fry sticky rice. I don’t have any recipe for it. This meal does take some experience as it is instinct-heavy cooking. A touch more, a touch less of water can make a huge difference.  Then again, this flavorful dish is worth the effort.IMG_0345

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Our meatless Monday meal…

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Steaming the winter melon with diced five spiced tofu, carrots, mushrooms, lotus seeds and snow fungus.

With 4lbs of chicken wings, we didn’t need 3 dishes tonight. Don’t think about saving some for leftovers…IMG_0297Plus snow fungus soup…IMG_0304

A foggy day to pay respect to the deceased on Double Ninth Festival (重陽 – observed on the ninth day of the ninth month in the Chinese.) The little ones were so eager to help out with grunt work.

Missed my dad so dearly…hope he’s doing great wherever he is…IMG_0258

You can pretty much find Yangzhou fried rice in every Chinese restaurant, and the cheapest rice plate on the menu. We normally don’t order it because I’d always thought it’s so easy to make at home. Strangely, I never made it…until a recent graving, which was tonight.

A couple of years ago, I had the best(est) Yangzhou fried rice in Hong Kong (西貢). That restaurant raved about their Michelin star rated Yangzhou fried rice. The waiter promised us we won’t be able to eat it anywhere else. He was absolutely right! Everything about that fried rice (at that restaurant) was so perfect, even ’til this day, I remembered it. Unfortunately, that one dish was shared by many, so I only had a two spoonfuls. I should have ordered more, but decided to try something else. Bad idea! Their rice left a huge impression on my palette and I don’t see Yangzhou fried rice the same anymore. I never ordered it ever since because I was afraid it might ruin it for me.

I wasn’t going to replicate it tonight because I can’t.  I just wanted to eat it and so I made it to satisfy my craving. IMG_0145

This time, I bought the lotus paste and the salted duck yolk. The store paste was so much different from the ones I made. These were much easier to work with. Because the colors of the dough and filling had so much contrast, I was able to wrap them nicely. Untitled.jpgHere are the finished products. I couldn’t get it to brown (yes, with egg wash) like it should be. I’m guessing it was my temperature? However, these moon cakes look and taste a lot like the store bought ones. So I’m happy to share them!IMG_0058IMG_0060

Happy mid-autumn festival! Though it’s a bit rushed (because of Ah Lo’s basketball practice), we found the time to sip some tea and enjoy the (store bought) moon cakes.IMG_0012

Skipping our meatless Monday today and made Hainanese chicken rice for the first time using the new toy – sous vide. Mr. Piggy bought this new tool almost a year and I’ve never gotten a chance to use it. He raved about it when he brought it home, but never touch it. Of course, he was waiting for me to do something with it. Finally today using the sous vide, we tried making the Hainanese chicken. Luckily he’s working from home so I can cook “remotely.” I prepped all the stuff last night and gave specific instructions for Mr. Piggy. Sorry the pictures are a bit blurry (they’re from Mr. Piggy’s phone). There’s not much cooking involved. Instead, just need someone to get it in the pot and remove it.

Chicken is cooked 3 hours at 75 degrees C using the sous vide.

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When done, give the chicken an ice bath and then air dry it for a good 3 hours.

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Voila! When I came home, I just need to cook the rice (using the chicken stock) and stir fry some greens. Dinner is served! The chicken is tender and juicy. My boys gave it two thumbs up and they claimed this to be ‘one of the better dinners.’

IMG_0001Though this doesn’t require much attention as the tool will cook to precision, however, you still need someone to “do the work.”

Attempted my first batch of the traditional mooncakes from scratch (and bombed it). There are many steps to it and it’s a great test of patience. Though I made some of the ingredients a head of time (golden syrup, the lotus paste and the dough), I was in and out of the house this weekend because of Ah Lo’s basketball tournament. It was hard for me to get this done correctly (with the time constraints). I am too embarrassed to show the end result. I won’t give up that easily. I will keep trying…

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I have always loved the chewy and slightly spongy texture of the braised EFu noodles (yee-meen 伊麵). They are very common in Chinese restaurants. These noodles tend to go with straw mushrooms and Chinese yellow chives (or sometimes with crab meat). They are supposed to be dry, and not all restaurants make it right (tend to bring it out with sauce). This dish is on the higher price mark on the menu. Today, decided to make it and can’t believe how easy to make them. I’ve added some homemade XO sauce to give it a little kick.IMG_9994